Research Groups

There are currently over 30 research groups at the Dunn School, with leaders drawn from across the world. Their diverse interests, backgrounds and expertise creates a dynamic and stimulating environment. Many groups share common research interests which fosters the vibrant scientific community found at the Dunn School.

Susan Lea

Host-pathogen interactions

An understanding of the way in which an invading pathogen interacts with its host at a molecular level is an essential aid to understanding the nature and extent of disease caused. My group aims to use a variety of techniques to probe the interactions that characterise different disease processes. Central to this approach is the use of X-ray...

Shona Murphy

The CTD of RNA polymerase II and elongation checkpoints

During transcription of both protein-coding and snRNA genes by RNA polymerase II (pol II), transcription and RNA processing are tightly coupled. Our most recent work has focused on understanding the mechanics of this connection.

 

Conrad Nieduszynski

DNA replication and genome stability

Complete, accurate replication of the genome is crucial for life. Errors during DNA replication give rise to mutations that cause genetic disease; failures during genome replication directly underlie several human disorders. DNA replication is the direct target of many chemotherapeutic agents.

Chris Norbury

Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in cancer.

We study post-transcriptional aspects of gene regulation, and specifically how these differ between cancer cells and their normal counterparts. One project in this area focuses on translation initiation factor eIF3e (also known as INT6), high levels of which in breast cancer are...

Nicholas Proudfoot

Gene punctuation: Transcriptional termination in eukaryotes.

We study molecular mechanisms that define the extent of transcription units in mammalian genomes by focusing on the molecular mechanism of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) termination.

Jordan Raff

Molecular dissection of centrioles, centrosomes and cilia

Centrioles organise the assembly of two important cell organelles: centrosomes and the cilia; our goal is to understand how these organelles function at the molecular level.

Elizabeth Robertson

Transcriptional regulators of mammalian development

Our research exploits mouse genetics to investigate the key signalling cues and transcriptional regulators governing cell fate decisions in the developing mammalian embryo. In particular, we have been studying the TGF family of secreted growth factors, including the ligand Nodal, and its downstream effector Smad2,...

Quentin Sattentau

Advancing understanding of HIV pathogenesis and vaccine design

Our current research spans the fields of HIV-1 dissemination, HIV-1 antibody-based vaccine design, and the molecular basis of allergy. We use a multi-disciplinary approach, which includes immunology, virology, chemistry, and cell biology together with cutting-edge imaging techniques to address fundamental...

Christoph Tang

Bacterial pathogenesis: molecular mechanisms to prevention

Human bacterial pathogens are a specialized subset of array microbes we encounter as part of our flora. The group seeks to understand the basis of how pathogens colonise specific niches in the body, evade elimination by the immune system, and cause disease. We study Neisseria spp., which are leading...

Anton van der Merwe

Recognition of abnormal cells by leukocyte receptors

The group studies the mechanisms by which leukocytes, such as T cells, use cell surface receptors to recognise infected or otherwise abnormal cells. The T cell receptor (TCR) plays a major role in this process by probing the surfaces of cells for the presence of 'foreign' peptides presented on MHC molecules in a...

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